Search results for history (19)

Edexcel Britain, 1830-85: Representation and Reform

Edexcel History – Great Reform – Britain, 1830 -85

Great Reform – Questions – 1815-32

History

History Edexcel Unit 2A : Germany 1918-1939 : Key Dates and Key People – GCSE Notes

Key Dates in Chronological Order

20 April 1889 Hitler born
9 November 1918 Kaiser abdicated
11 November 1918 Armistice signed
January 1919 Spartacist uprisings
9 January 1919 German Workers’ Party (DAP) founded
28 June 1919 Germans signed Treaty of Versailles
August 1919 New constitution drawn up
1920 Kapp Putsch
7 August 1920 DAP became National Socialist German Workers’ Party (NSDAP)
1921 Hitler became NSDAP’s Führer
1921 Sturmabteilung (SA) created
November 1923 Munich Putsch
1923 French Occupation of the Ruhr
September (more…)

To Kill a Mockingbird – Chapter Analysis – GCSE Notes

CHAPTER 1

Themes

-       Child naivety, superstition.

-       Boo Radley depiction.

-       Innocence

Analysis

-       Child naivety, superstition: Jem and Scout are the centre of the story, filling it with their world of imagination and superstition, centred on town myths such as the curious history of Boo Radley and imaginative diversions such as acting out stories from books.

-       Innocence: One of the central themes of To Kill a Mockingbird is the process of growing up and developing a more (more…)

History : Causes for the First World War – GCSE Notes

The world was split into different groups and empires and each country desired to increase their wealth and overseas colonies or more land. Countries were driven by nationalism and one country in particular was Germany. With Prussia; a small province in Germany, having recently defeated French provinces: Alsace and Lorraine.  Prussia united all of German’s provinces and Germany was very much for imperialism and the government gave the army a high profile under Kaiser Wilhelm II who was much for (more…)

Edexcel History A Unit 1 : Sections 4, 5 & 6 Key Dates – GCSE Notes

Section 4
Date Event
1941 Grand Alliance created
1943 Tehran Conference
1945 Yalta Conference
1945 American tests first atomic bomb
1945 Potsdam Conference
1946 Churchill’s ‘Iron Curtain’ speech
1946 Long Telegram sent
1946 Novikov’s Telegram sent
1947 Truman Doctrine announced
1947 Marshall Plan announced
1947 Cominform created
1948 Paris Conference
1948-9 Berlin Blockade
1949 Comecon created
1949 West Germany and East Germany created
1949 Formation of NATO
1949 USSR develop atomic bomb
1953 Death of Stalin
1953 Development of Hydrogen bomb by USA and USSR
1955 Warsaw Pact established
1956 Khrushchev’s ‘Secret Speech’
1956 Soviet invasion of Hungary

(more…)

Edexcel History A Unit 1 : Sections 4, 5 & 6 Key Dates – GCSE Notes

Section 4
Date Event
1941 Grand Alliance created
1943 Tehran Conference
1945 Yalta Conference
1945 American tests first atomic bomb
1945 Potsdam Conference
1946 Churchill’s ‘Iron Curtain’ speech
1946 Long Telegram sent
1946 Novikov’s Telegram sent
1947 Truman Doctrine announced
1947 Marshall Plan announced
1947 Cominform created
1948 Paris Conference
1948-9 Berlin Blockade
1949 Comecon created
1949 West Germany and East Germany created
1949 Formation of NATO
1949 USSR develop atomic bomb
1953 Death of Stalin
1953 Development of Hydrogen bomb by USA and USSR
1955 Warsaw Pact established
1956 Khrushchev’s ‘Secret Speech’
1956 Soviet invasion of Hungary

(more…)

Compare and contrast the poems 'Vultures' and 'What Were They Like'. – GCSE Essay

I have chosen to compare ‘Vultures’ and ‘What Were They Like’; both poems showing references to a war, but although about a similar subject, each poem portrays it differently, making use of various linguistic and structural devices.

‘Vultures’ portrays a contrast between good and evil, and the vultures and the Commandant in the poem symbolize evil, but are nonetheless still capable of love. The opening lines, ‘In the greyness and drizzle of one despondent dawn unstirred by harbingers’ establish the (more…)

Compare and contrast the poems ‘Vultures’ and ‘What Were They Like’. – GCSE Essay

I have chosen to compare ‘Vultures’ and ‘What Were They Like’; both poems showing references to a war, but although about a similar subject, each poem portrays it differently, making use of various linguistic and structural devices.

‘Vultures’ portrays a contrast between good and evil, and the vultures and the Commandant in the poem symbolize evil, but are nonetheless still capable of love. The opening lines, ‘In the greyness and drizzle of one despondent dawn unstirred by harbingers’ establish the (more…)

Marcel Breuer 1

Marcel Breuer and the Wassily Chair – GCSE Notes/ Essay

Why has this trend setter been so influential?

Marcel Breuer had two very successful careers as an architect and designer. His minimalistic designs and use of plywood pieces made him an icon of the modernist movement and established him as one of the 20th century’s most influential furniture designers.

Equally, his work as an architect having designed the famous Whitney Museum of Modern Art in New York, which made use of a staircase facade made from granite stones and upside-down windows on (more…)

History

Edexcel Unit 3 Paper

History Edexcel Unit 3C : Example Answers – GCSE Notes

 

 

  • History A (The Making of the Modern World) Unit 3: Modern World Source Enquiry

Option 3C: A divided union? The USA 1945-70

  • Wednesday 9 June 2010 – Morning – 5HA03/3c
  • 1) What can you learn from Source A about the Rosenbergs? 6 marks

    From Source A we can infer that the Rosenbergs are being blamed for handing over secret information regarding the atomic bomb to the USSR, thus allowing them to develop it much sooner than the USA had anticipated. We can also learn that the judge has found the Rosenbergs guilty of treason and that they will receive at least a life’s sentence. We can also infer that the judge is largely blaming the Russian development of the atomic bomb to also trigger the aggression of war in Korea. (more…)

    History Edexcel Unit 3 : The USA 1945-1970 – GCSE Notes

    Content

    • Topic 1
      • The impact of the Cold War
      • The Red Scare
      • McCarthyism
      • The Rosenberg Case
      • The fall of McCarthy
    • Topic 2
      • The civil rights movement
      • Peaceful protest
      • The Montgomery Bus Boycott
      • Using the law
      • Integrating Little Rock, 1957
      • Sit-ins and freedom riders, 1961
      • Opposition to the civil rights movement
    • Topic 3
      • Changing vies
      • Birmingham
      • The march on Washington
      • Malcolm X
      • President Kennedy and Civil Rights
      • Freedom Summer
      • Landmark Laws
      • Black Power
      • Riots
      • The assassination of Martin Luther King
    • Topic 4
      • The USA in the 1960s
      • ‘Turn on, tune in, drop out’
      • Student protests
      • Kent State shootings
      • The position of women in the early 1960s
      • Women’s liberation movements
    • Exam Technique
    • Sample Answers (more…)

    History Edexcel Unit 2A : Example Answers – GCSE Notes

    Source A : From a history of Germany, published in 1996

    The Spartacists tried to seize power on 5 January 1919 but they were doomed to failure. The day before they began their rising, Ebert created a volunteer force of 4,000 soldiers. Known as the Free Corps, they were hard men who hated communists and like a fight. They were well disciplined, fully equipped and ruthless. They retook all thee Spartacist occupied buildings in Berlin and captured and shot the two Spartacist leaders.

    1a) What does Source A tell us about the reasons for the failure of the Spartacist uprising of January 1919? – 4 marks

    The source tells us that there was already a group called the ‘Free Corps’ ready to counter the uprising before it even started. The group were also much better trained and they had experience and a personal hatred for the opposition. also if only two leaders were shot, then the Spartacist’s themselves were themselves probably not equipped as they did not give up a strong fight.

    b) Describe the economic problems Germany experienced in the years 1919-22. 6 marks

    After the treaty of Versailles was signed by the Weimar Government in 1919, Germany had to pay £6,600 million to the other countries in reparations. This meant in Germany taxes largely increase to pay these reparations, which was on top of the fact that  they were already in economic turmoil as they had spent almost all their resources and money on the war and this was also a key factor in why they had to surrender. Moreover, important, valuable land such as Silesia was taken from Germany and Germany lost 50% of its iron reserves.

    Germany could no longer pay the reparations to France in 1923, causing the invasion of the Ruhr. This was the place of 80% of Germany’s industry and without that they could no longer import items. The occupation made the situation even worse. (more…)

    History Edexcel Unit 2A : Germany 1918-1939 – GCSE Notes

    Contents

    • Topic 1 - The Weimar Republic 1918-1933
      • The Treaty of Versailles
      • The Weimar Republic
      • Economic Problems
      • Political Problems
      • Weimar Recovery and the : Era
      • The Great Depression
    • Topic 2 – Hitler and the growth of the Nazi party 1918-1933
      • Adolf Hitler’s early life
      • The birth of the Nazi Party
      • The Munich Putsch
      • The rebirth of Nazism
      • Nazi party during 1924-1929
      • Growth of Nazi support
      • The Nazis gaining power
    • Topic 3 - The Nazi dictatorship 1933-1939
      • The removal of opposition
      • The Nazi police state
      • Censorship and propaganda
    • Topic 4 – Nazi domestic policies 1933-1939
      • Youth and education in Nazi Germany
      • Women in Nazi Germany
      • Work and employment
      • The standard of living
      • Persecution of minorities
    • Exam Technique
    • Example Answers (more…)

    History Edexcel Unit 1 : Example Answers – GCSE Notes

    Section 4

    4a) Describe one decision that was made about Germany at the Potsdam Conference (July-August 1945). (2 marks)

    One decision that was made was to split Germany into four temporary zones allocated to France, Britain, America and USSR.

    2/2

    4b) Answers either Part (b)(i) OR Part (b)(ii)

    • (b)(i) Briefly explain the key features of the Truman Doctrine (1947). (6 marks)
    • (b)(ii) Briefly explain the key features of the Marshall Plan (1947). (6 marks)

     

    The Truman Doctrine was set up by President Harry S. Truman to contain communism within Europe. The feature of containment meant that the USA would intervene into any country which was turning communist. This was through economic aid offered by the USA, as communism flourished in areas of poverty.

    Another key feature is that this went against the USA’s policy of ‘isolationism’ whereby the USA would not intervene in foreign affairs. The Truman Doctrine meant however the USA would be very munch involved in Europe.

    Lastly another key feature is that the Truman Doctrine showed a clear divide between the USA and USSR. It was one of the first milestones of the beginning of the ‘Cold War’. It was a defiant step by Truman in stopping Stalin spreading communism in Europe, thus preventing the domino theory from occurring that if one country falls, the rest will follow.

    6/6

    4c) Explain why relations between the USA and the Soviet Union grew worse in the years 1943-56. (12 marks) (more…)

    History Edexcel Unit 1 : USA 1941-1980 – GCSE Notes

    Contents

    • Section 4
      • What was the Cold War?
      • The breakdown of the Grand Alliance
      • Fear of War
      • Truman Doctrine and Marshall Aid
      • Satellite States
      • First Confrontation
      • Hungary under Soviet rule: liberation and oppression
    • Section 5
      • The Berlin Crisis: a divided city
      • Negotiation and stalemate
      • The Berlin Wall
      • The Cuban Missile Crisis
      • Immediate and long-term consequences
      • Czechoslovakia: ‘Prague Spring’
      • The Brezhnev Doctrine
      • International Reaction
    • Section 6
      • Détente
      • the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
      • American reaction to invasion
      • ‘Evil Empire’ Ronald Reagan
      • ‘Star Wars’ – America strikes back
      • Gorbachev
      • Reagan and Gorbachev’s changing relationship
      • The break-up of Eastern Europe and the fall of the Berlin Wall
      • Gorbachev and the end of the Cold War: the fall of the Soviet Union
    • Exam Technique
    • Example Answers with Examiner’s comments

     

    Section 4: How did the Cold War develop? 1943-56

    Communism and Capitalism

    Capitalism Communism
    Values Freedom of speech, no censorship, freedom of religions, freedom of protest Equality
    Economic Values Hierarchy of wealth, privately owned businesses, free-market Equality of wealth, no private property or business.
    Elections Democratic elections Dictatorship – one party-state

    The Grand Alliance (1941)

    • Before the Cold War and whilst Hitler, the leader of Nazi Germany, was still a threat to the world, America and the USSR worked together as members of the Grand Alliance.
    • The alliance was created in 1941 to defeat the Nazis
    • The Grand Alliance was merely a marriage of convenience between communists and capitalists united only in their opposition to Hitler. (more…)

    Lord of the Flies – Notes on the Characters and Themes – GCSE Notes

    GCSE Lord of the Flies – English Literature:

    Contents (54 A4 Pages)

    • Ralph
    • Jack
    • Piggy
    • Simon
    • Roger
    • Samneric
    • The Knife
    • The Glasses
    • The Conch
    • Leadership
    • The Signal Fire
    • Type of Language
    • Bestial Imagey
    • Use of Irony
    • Author and Background
    • Island Setting
    • The Name
    • The Beast
    • Structure
    • Boys Names
    • Key Events
    • Coral Island
    • Freud

    Analysis of Major Characters:

    Ralph:

    • What he does in the novel:
      • Uses conch to summon survivors – this is Ralphs first use of power (p11-12)
      • Builds fire to help boys get rescued (p37)
      • Attempts to build shelters for the younger boys (p50)
      • Raises issues to aid survival and rescue (p84-88)
      • Explores a part of the island where the boys think the beast may lurk (p114-115)
      • Hunted by savages and is saved by the naval officer (p222)
    • His Good Qualities:
      • Athletic, charismatic protagonist of the novel as he is both good natured and good looking. He has no hidden depths or unhealthy character traits à ‘‘There was a mildness about his mouth and eyes that proclaimed no devil’’
      • Strong sense of responsibility:
        • He makes sure Piggy will look after the littluns when he goes looking for the beast.
        • He and Simon also carry Percival to a shelter when he has a nightmare.
        • When the boys are looking for the beast Ralph says ‘’I’m chief. I’ll go. Don’t argue’’ (p114)
        • Only Ralph is able to come to terms with the reasons why Simon was killed – he is willing to share the blame and responsibility for Simon’s death à ‘‘don’t you understand, Piggy? The things we did-‘’
      • Natural leader:
        • ‘’There was a stillness about Ralph that marked him out: there was his size, and attractive appearance; and most obscurely, yet most powerfully, there was the conch’’ (p19)
        • He thinks ahead and believes that rescue from the island is essential. His efforts are directed to keep the fire going so as to maximise their chances à ‘’They’ll see the smoke’’
        • He delegates tasks – letting jack be in charge of choir and hunting (‘’the choir belongs to you of course’’ (p19), and gives the name taking job to Piggy à ‘’Now go back, Piggy, and take names’’ (p22)
        • At times he displays rational thinking & explains ideas calmly à he explains to everyone at first mention of the beast that ‘’you couldn’t have a beasties on an island this size…you only get them in big countries like Africa or India’’ (p34)
        • He deals with situations effectively – facing up to Jack at Castle Rock, and talks to piggy with directness of genuine leadership when he has upset Piggy à ‘’Better Piggy than Fatty’ he said at last with the directness of genuine leadership. ‘I’m sorry if you feel like that’’(p21-22)

    (more…)

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